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    Aspect Ratios

  • What aspect ratio screen should I order – 2.35:1, 2.40:1, or 2.37:1?

    The fact is that there is an entire range of aspect ratios, mostly from 2.35:1 to 2.40, used by directors for major motion pictures. “2.35:1” has caught on mostly because many of the earlier True Widescreen movies (as opposed to those made for smaller screen) were filmed in this ratio. “True Widescreen” is used to encompass the format realm of major motion pictures in an attempt to minimize confusion. However, “2.35:1” is still strongly part of the vernacular for emerging home cinema so we use just as frequently. The direct answer is that we recommend a 2.40:1 screen and to set your system up so that 1.85 movies (in a constant height system) fill the top and bottom of your 2.40 screen. There are a lot of convoluted reasons for this, but basically using a 2.40:1 screen seems to be the most effective way of minimizing black bars (or strips) from the top and bottom of popular content short of having adjustable masking.
  • What movies are available in the True Widescreen 2.40:1 ratio?

    A quick check through your current DVD, Blu-ray or HD-DVD collection will probably reveal that the majority of movies you already own are in the 2.35:1 or greater ratio. Simply look on the back cover and you will probably see the “this movie is in letterbox format – the black bars at the top and bottom of your screen are normal” along with a “2.35:1” or “2.40:1” designation. Almost all of these films will work properly with a Panamorph lens system and compatible scaler / projector. This is also true of many high definition movies on TV, cable or satellite.
  • Will the Panamorph lenses work with “XYZ” projector?

    In all likelihood, yes. Panamorph lenses are designed with a very large aperture so that it would even accommodate projectors with very large lenses or beam spots. Having a large aperture also means that the lenses will work through the entire zoom range of most projectors, which greatly eases installation concerns.
  • What movies are available in the True Widescreen 2.40:1 / 2.35:1 or greater ratio?

    A quick check through your current DVD or Blu-ray collection will probably reveal that the majority of movies you already own are in the 2.35:1 or greater ratio. Simply look on the back cover and you will probably see the “this movie is in letterbox format – the black bars at the top and bottom of your screen are normal” along with a “2.35:1,” “2.39:1” or “2.40:1” designation. Almost all of these films will work properly with a projector and screen. The best experience is when paired with a Panamorph lens, or projector with a widescreen native sensor. This is also true of many high definition movies on TV, cable or satellite.
  • How Does The Panamorph Anamorphic Lens Work?